• The Cox house

    The Cox house

  • Wolford House
  • Glen Forest Cemetery
Photograph courtesy of the Yellow Springs Historical Society.

Photograph courtesy of the Yellow Springs Historical Society.

One hundred and twenty years ago, Yellow Springs residents were celebrating the Fourth of July much like we will be celebrating tomorrow night at Gaunt Park.

As published in The Yellow Springs Torch, on July 5, 1895:

The Fourth.

The Fourth of July in this place was duly celebrated by our citizens. Those who could get away went out of town, even if they had to walk to the river. The fire works on the night previous and on the Fourth of July night eclised [eclipsed] anything that we have had in that line for many years. It was a big time with sky rockets, baloons (sic) and fire crackers galore. Read Full Article →

Photograph courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Photograph courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Scarlet Fever was once a very common and often deadly disease among children .  Caused by a streptococcus infection, scarlet fever, struck fear in communities up through the early twentieth century.  This childhood disease was such a common part of life that it was part of the plot of the famous children’s book, The Velveteen Rabbit, published in 1922.  The healing waters of the Yellow Springs could not keep this childhood disease at bay.

As published in the Cincinnati Enquirer on January 27, 1914:

ANTIOCH COLLEGE

Ordered Closed on Account of Scarlet Fever Cases.

SPECIAL DISPATCH TO THE ENQUIRER.

Springfield, Ohio, January 26–Antioch College, at Yellow Springs, was ordered closed today by the faculty for two weeks because of an epidemic of scarlet fever. Read Full Article →